St. Kilda Trip Pt. 5

The last part of the adventure was the trip back to Uig. Derek promised that there were some highlights still to come and he was right. We left Village Bay at 13:30 and had a closer look ar some of the cliffs of Hirta, including the Britain highest cliff, a sheer drop of 1400 feet below Conacher. The men of St. Kilda scaled these cliffs in search of birds and eggs using only ropes made from horsehair and their hands and feet.

 

Hirta Cliff

Hirta Cliff

 

We also had a look at Glen Bay, where Derek sat out the high winds on Monday. There is an arch through the cliffs there, which provided a look through to Boreray, the second largest island of St. Kilda.

Boreray Through The Arch

Boreray Through The Arch

 

We then went to look at the world’s largest Gannet colony and on the way had a wonderful view of Stac Lee on the left, Stac an Armin in the middle and Boreray on the right. In 1727 a small group of three men and eight boys went to Stac an Armin, as was usual, to bring back birds and they were stranded there for 9 months. The village on Hirta had been struck by an outbreak of smallpox and the men who were supposed to bring the group back could not do so. In fact most of the population died and new tennants had to be brough over from the Hebrides and mainland Scotland.

Stac Lee, Stac An Armin And Boreray

Stac Lee, Stac An Armin And Boreray

 

Some of the thousands of Gannets on Stac Lee checked out the boat and provided a great spectacle.

Two Gannets

Two Gannets

 

Stac Lee

Stac Lee

 

One of the cliffs of Boreray resembled a dog’s head, with a Gannet acting as the catchlight in its eye.

Dog's Head

Dog’s Head

 

Then it was time for us to begin the 5 hour journey back to Uig. Like on the way over to St. Kilda, I was lucky not to suffer at all with sea sickness. Others were glad of the short break on Berneray. After we got to Uig and siad our goodbyes, we quickly grabbed some Fish & Chips in Portree and Simon decided to spend the night in a comfortable, warm bed rather than a small, damp tent. It was quite an adventure and one that I will repeat at some point in the future.

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